Google (Alphabet) has its own eponymous app for both iOS and Android devices called “Google”. Sometimes it is more colloquially referred to (especially inside the company) as Google Now. The premise is a smart app that trolls your emails, location data, maps history, calendar, and other information that Google knows about you to offer you recommendations and information that Google thinks you would want to know.

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Each snippet of information shows up in a little card. There are cards for weather, traffic, public transportation information, news, sports scores, airline reservations, your calendar schedule, stock prices, restaurant reservations, and more. Google wants to predict what you might be thinking and when and offer you specific answers to your internal questions based on a host of information already saved somewhere inside your personal Google account. It also wants to keep you updated on your life events that might be happening via your emails and calendars. Users can click cards for more information, swipe away cards when they are deemed unnecessary or not useful, and scroll to find more cards.

Furthermore, the app features Google voice search command that one sees so often on TV commercials. Open the app, tell your phone your search query, and most of the time it’ll give you a nice little list of results with some snazzy narration.

If one is an avid Google user and funnels his or her email, calendar, internet browsing, video watching, and social life through Google properties, then the app can actually be quite useful. I especially find it useful regarding upcoming flights—the app goes through your email confirmations received from airlines and displays all the relevant information for you in a little, easy-to-digest card format. Another cool use case is for traffic. Presuming Google knows where you work and where you live, it can give you real-time traffic information (taken from standard Google Maps app) and suggest when you should start heading home (via a push notification). Another nice touch is that it includes calls-to-action with some cards, whether it’s to buy tickets to an event, book a hotel, reserve a table at a restaurant, or buy a product. So far, no ads have shown up in the card feed—probably because the usage is so low there are no advertisers willing to spend money to reach minimal eyeballs. Another plausible explanation is that Google doesn’t want to clutter this product with ads as it has with so many of its other products.

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The service has been out for quite some time (I have been using it since 2013 and only because I was working at Google) but an informal HBS straw poll of 10 students showed that not one person had even heard about this app offering from Google. I can confirm that sentiment elsewhere in the tech-hub and tech-forward Bay Area, California nonetheless. Few outside of Google actually know Google even has an app, let alone what it does or how it can be useful. Despite massive TV advertising, among the generation of 20-30 somethings this Google app has been far from a hit.

One of the more amazing but downright eerie features of the Google app is the location history. If you have the app and have your location services on (which I presume many users do by default but there is definitely an option to turn it off), Google will track your every movement via your phone and GPS. Look at where I went on December 29, 2014. I can confirm I did play golf that day out in Eastern San Diego and then returned home.

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How about Sunday September 28, 2014? I clearly made a full day of Harvard. I wonder what I was doing on Linden Street?

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I flew home on Thanksgiving Day in 2014 to surprise my whole family who thought I wasn’t coming home for the holiday. Good thing they have no idea this even exists on Google.

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It even tracked me during FIELD II all the way in Brazil on January 4, 2015. Don’t tell mom I went to Bar Tize in Belo Horizonte!

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One doesn’t have to think very hard about all the possibilities of how this information could be useful, harmful, interesting, and disastrous all at the same time. I am sure this would take relationships to a new level if only people actually knew about this. For Google and for me, it’s scary—Google basically knows everywhere I go and when I go there with a good degree of accuracy. Should I be upset or should I be thankful in case this information actually comes in handy one day? I think that’s up for an individual to decide. But regardless, Google has done a poor job marketing this feature—I wonder why…

 In summary, if you are a Google maniac and run your life through Google products, Google Now could be very useful for you. I actually really, really like the idea of smart recommendations and trying to predict what you are thinking and/or the information you need. I think it’s the future of the connected world—having technology think for you. And I believe Google is the one company in the world best positioned to do this due to the extensive data they have on all of us. However, without adoption or a solid marketing effort (a problem that is pervasive throughout Google for most of its products and services), this app is nothing but a fun little app for Google employees, ex-employees, and those who love their TV commercials or happen to stumble upon it one day. Perhaps Google doesn’t care to advertise it because they are still working on making the cards relevant and smart and don’t want mass adoption of a less-than-optimal solution.

Finally, the location history is an interesting one. I love showing my friends the technology and most are very intrigued when I do, wondering if they can figure out their own location history. Most are disappointed that they can’t because they don’t have the Google App installed. But then they have no real desire to install it, so they don’t.

Overall, it is definitely a fun little exercise to think about what Google can do with Google Now and what the future might hold.

By: Danny Belch


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